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World Security Report

UN Member States need “to share information […] to prevent, protect, mitigate, investigate, respond to and recover from damage from terrorist attacks on critical infrastructure facilities, including through joint training, and use or establishment of relevant communication or emergency warning networks.”

Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Europe launches Preliminary Conference Programme Delivering an outstanding conference programme of international expert speakers contributing to the valuable discussion on protecting Europe’s critical infrastructure.

Part of the City of The Hague’s 2018 Cyber Security Week, Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Europe will include topics of discussion such as: • Risk and Resilience in CIP and CIIP • PPP Role in CIP • Emergency Preparedness and Response in CNI • Cyber Security Legislation, Best Practice & Standards • Cyber Defence Strategies • Cyber Technologies to Prevent and Protect • SCADA Systems and IT/OT Integration • Emerging and Future Threats on CNI • Space Based CNI • Human Factors, Organisation Risk and Management Culture • Risk Management in Transport, Telecoms and Energy CIP

Wildfires in Mediterranean Europe will increase by 40% at 1.5°C warming, say scientists

Europe’s Mediterranean regions have strong sunshine, bright blue seas, beautiful beaches, and pretty holiday houses immersed in pine forests that provide welcome shade. It sounds very inviting, but such a scenario is also perfect for severe wildfires such as the ones that killed 99 people this July in the popular holiday resort of Mati, in Greece.
Now, new research in Nature Communications suggests that the summer fire season in Mediterranean Europe is going to get worse. Under the hottest climatic predictions of 3°C warming, the area that is currently burned every year would double. Even more worryingly, 40% more area would be burnt even if the Paris Climate Agreement is fulfilled and warming stays below “only” 1.5°C.

UNDP-supported National Adaptation Plan project benefits from US$2.5 million Green Climate Fund grant

The Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina with the support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) launched today a new project today financed by the Green Climate Fund (GCF) with a US$2.56 million grant to advance the National Adaptation Plan process and reach goals outlined in the Paris Agreement and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
UNDP in partnership with government institutions on all levels will implement the four-year project “Advance the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process for medium-term investment planning in climate sensitive sectors in Bosnia-Herzegovina.”

UR INSIDER: KEY TAKEAWAYS AND INSIGHTS FROM UNDERSTANDING RISK BALKANS

As extreme weather becomes the “new normal” in the Balkans, governments and communities across the region are striving to better understand the climate and disaster risks they face so that they can put in place the appropriate policies and strategies.
It was against this backdrop that hundreds of experts and practitioners from the resilience and disaster risk management community, including dozens of young people, shared ideas, best practices, and lessons learned on identifying, communicating and assessing risk at Understanding Risk (UR) Balkans, the first ever gathering of the 10,000-strong UR community in the region.

UR Understanding Risk Balkans Conference, September 17-19, 2018 | Belgrade Serbia

The vision of the conference is to help further the understanding of risk by supporting a network of experts and practitioners that share knowledge and experience, and discuss best practices and innovative approaches in assessing risk and communicating risk information. UR has become the preeminent platform for collaboration, knowledge sharing, and innovation in identifying and assessing disaster risk.

Tackling Climate Extremes with Technology in the Balkans

Extreme weather is fast becoming the 'new normal' in the Balkans. In May 2014, historic flooding pushed over 125,000 people into poverty in Serbia alone, and caused damages and losses well over $2 billion in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A stifling round of record temperatures smothered Southern Europe last year, buckling train tracks in Serbia and earning the nickname ‘Lucifer’ for scorching temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius, with similar temperatures affecting the region just a few months ago. According to international researchers, climate change played a significant role in both these heatwaves – and trends may worsen in coming decades.