News

EU Floods Directive 2007 had positive effects overall, but planning and implementation now need improvements

The EU Directive of 2007 led to progress in assessing the risks of floods, but the planning and implementation of flood protection should now be improved, according to a new report from the European Court of Auditors. The auditors warn that major challenges remain in the much fuller integration of climate change, flood insurance and spatial planning into flood risk management. They are critical of weaknesses in allocating funding.

DPPI SEE Secretariat present at the European Forum for Disaster Risk Reduction in Rome, 21-23 November 2018

Last week representatives of the Europena countries, stakeholeder groups and partners were present in Rome at the European Forum for Disaster Risk Reduction (EFDRR). Italian Prime Minister, Giuseppe Conte, opened the event and with that became the firts Prime Minister to open a European Forum for Disaster Risk Reduction. The event itslef brought together over 700 participants engaging them in various pannel discussions. All DPPI SEE member states were present and had the chance also to present their national achievements in DRR. DPPI SEE Head of Secretariat participated in the panel session dedicated to the regional approaches in capacity development for DRR. The Head of Secretariat presented the Initiative and spoke about the positive experience from the DRR capacity development project that was implemented together with CADRI and MSB. This project created the first pool of DRR experts in the region who gave significant contribution to the creation of the National 
Platforms for DRR in their home countries.

 

Reducing Risk Before Disaster Strikes: Seven Lessons from Turkey

This brief captures the lessons from evaluating the World Bank’s Istanbul Seismic Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project.

Background: Population Centers in Turkey are Highly Vulnerable to Earthquakes

Turkey faces high vulnerability to earthquakes, with Istanbul posing the most serious risk due its high seismic risk and its role as the population and economic center of Turkey. A major earthquake near Istanbul in 1999 led to over 17,000 deaths and damage estimated at $US 5-13 billion. The World Bank supported a post-earthquake reconstruction project over 1999-2006, but vulnerability to earthquakes remained high, especially for Istanbul.

A major earthquake in Istanbul would be catastrophic, and could derail the country’s development trajectory. The government was committed to undertaking disaster risk mitigation, but needed external assistance and support to do so. The World Bank was a suitable partner based on its financing capacity, technical expertise in disaster risk management and mitigation, and credibility and trust in Turkey based on prior disaster risk management engagements. These considerations motivated the creation of the Istanbul Seismic Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project (ISMEP) as a proactive risk mitigation effort.

World disasters report 2018

Calling on the international humanitarian sector to do more to respond to the needs of the world’s most vulnerable people
In recent years, Governments and aid organisations have made various commitments about ensuring that the world’s most vulnerable people are not “left behind”.
But those commitments are not being reached. We estimate in the 2018 World Disasters Report that millions of people living in crisis are not receiving the humanitarian assistance they desperately need.